The lost years

Sea turtles hatchlings go straight to the ocean after hatching. They will return to coastal waters as juveniles to forage. Not much is known about the years in between these two events, which is why this period has been dubbed the “lost years”. One thing that is known is that when the hatchlings first reach the surf they swim out to open waters for several days on end during what is called the juvenile frenzy. One of the ways this was demonstrated in the 1970s was by having good swimmers follow the hatchlings out at sea. It is thought that after a certain amount of time, the great oceanic currents catch the hatchlings. New research carried out recently in Boa Vista, Cape Verde, confirms this hypothesis. The researchers followed hatchlings with a boat for up to eight hours and up to 15 km out at sea using acoustic nano-tags. Dr Rebecca Scott, the lead author of the study reports that “for years, people have always spoken about hatchlings being swept away in the currents, but this is really the first good, direct evidence for that happening.” The results of this study are valuable to help better understand the biology of sea turtles and to get more information about the “lost years”. This, in turn, will be vital to develop more efficient conservation policies to protect this endangered species.

Video courtesy of the New York Times – http://nyti.ms/1tyjsF1

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One thought on “The lost years

  1. Pingback: The living tag experiments | turtles and tides

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