Terrestrial basking and climate change

Terrestrial basking is a rare behavior observed in populations of green sea turtles in Hawai’i, Western Australia, and the Galápagos Archipelago. Being cold-blooded, the main reason why turtles bask on land is probably to regulate their body temperature but scientists speculate that terrestrial basking may also aid immune function, predator avoidance, and may even prevent unwanted courtship.

New research published in Biology Letters examined the relationship between terrestrial basking and climate. Having counted the number of turtles that bask on one Hawaiian beach every day for six years, the researchers found that terrestrial basking peaks in the year when the sea surface temperatures are lowest. Terrestrial basking generally happens when sea surface temperatures fall below 23°C. This suggests that terrestrial basking is a response to seasonally cool ocean temperatures.

Picture 2

Basking varies seasonally in concert with cool SST. Green circles are standardized anomalies of the number of turtles observed basking weekly at Laniakea, Oahu. Blue circles are weekly AVHRR SST data for this location. Thick dark lines are the Fourier series for each timeseries. (Source: Biology Letters)

However, since the sea surface temperatures at the sites where turtles bask on land is warming on average 0.04°C per year, the researchers predict that in the future the waters will be warm enough that the turtles will no longer come on land for warmth. The researchers estimate terrestrial basking may cease in Hawaii by 2039, in Australia by 2086, and in the Galápagos by 2102. Since other populations of marine turtles are successful without having to resort to terrestrial basking, this will probably not have drastic negative impacts on these green turtle population, but this does mean that beach goers of the future will not have the privilege of sharing the beach with napping turtles.

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